Cartographia

#GIS #geography #remotesensing #geospatial #humangeography #cartography #spatial

In addition to my tumblr blog which is themed for pictures of anything geo-related - I have recently created an additional blog which will be more text-based with geographic storyboard postings.  

GeoNetworks is a collaborative Social Networking website for the Geographic, Geoscience, and Geospatial Communities and a site for geo-professionals to network and learn from each other.  Some of the options are galleries, forums, walls, chat, messages, groups, events, news, and blogs.

LOL - GIS analysis of the Zombie Apocalypse in Austin, Texas.  Hopefully this is not for real :) but things are very different in Texas so who knows!
"The City of Austin, TX prepared a risk assessment map of the zombie apocalypse in back in 2007. This pioneering group of spatial analysts calculated the average spread of a zombie horde at approximately 1.5 miles per hour. The classic debate of zombie speed comes to mind.”

LOL - GIS analysis of the Zombie Apocalypse in Austin, Texas.  Hopefully this is not for real :) but things are very different in Texas so who knows!

"The City of Austin, TX prepared a risk assessment map of the zombie apocalypse in back in 2007. This pioneering group of spatial analysts calculated the average spread of a zombie horde at approximately 1.5 miles per hour. The classic debate of zombie speed comes to mind.”

Awesome…I can’t believe someone took the time to analyze Santa’s journey (tracked by NORAD) via spatial-temporal analysis with the visualization software Geotime.  Had to share with this my fellow geographers and Santa-lovers.

Twitter’s Early Growth Relied On Geographic Proximity via @RWW #twitter #map

Each circle represents a U.S. city containing Twitter users. Circles grow in size as more users sign up in that location over time. When a location has reached a “critical mass” of users, or 13.5% of all eventual users have signed up, the location turns red. The line being drawn across the center of the screen is a time series of the number of new users that signed up across the whole country in a given week.

GEOINT (geospatial intelligence) support to MLB all-star game in Phoenix, AZ.

GEOINT (geospatial intelligence) support to MLB all-star game in Phoenix, AZ.

Philadelphia: 3D City Engine Urban Planning #GIS
3D Spatial Analysis of Air Pollution in Madrid, Spain @APHumanGeog #GIS #pollution
http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/

3D Spatial Analysis of Air Pollution in Madrid, Spain @APHumanGeog #GIS #pollution

http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/

National Geographic and Esri Team on Map for Web and Mobile
RT @ geospatialnews RT @spatialsustain

"National Geographic and Esri reveal a new multi-scale general  reference map of the world for use by the public and for education  purposes. The map uses the familiar cartographic styling that National  Geographic developed over more than 100 years of map making, and offers  multiple scales of viewing from global all the way down to 1:144k scale  for the globe and 1:9k scale for North America.
Through ArcGIS online hosting, users are able to use this map for the  creation of their own maps, by adding layers to this basemap or  creating their own overlay layers.
The map uses data from a variety of leading data providers, including DeLorme, NAVTEQ, UNEP-WCMC, NASA, ESA, USGS, and others.
Take a tour of the map features here or access the map here.” ~vector1media

National Geographic and Esri Team on Map for Web and Mobile

RT @ geospatialnews RT @spatialsustain

"National Geographic and Esri reveal a new multi-scale general reference map of the world for use by the public and for education purposes. The map uses the familiar cartographic styling that National Geographic developed over more than 100 years of map making, and offers multiple scales of viewing from global all the way down to 1:144k scale for the globe and 1:9k scale for North America.

Through ArcGIS online hosting, users are able to use this map for the creation of their own maps, by adding layers to this basemap or creating their own overlay layers.

The map uses data from a variety of leading data providers, including DeLorme, NAVTEQ, UNEP-WCMC, NASA, ESA, USGS, and others.

Take a tour of the map features here or access the map here.” ~vector1media

A spatial look at the names associated with hydrography in the United States.  I never thought about how different hydrographic names varied by geographic region until I saw this map.  I always thought it was strange that when I moved to Virginia, everything was referred to as a Branch or Run instead of where I grew up in NY, everything was called a Kill or a Creek.
"Generic place names (or toponyms) such as Cumberland Gap or Mount Rainier  provide general categorical descriptions of a geographic feature, in  contrast to specific toponyms, which provide a unique identifier: Lake Huron. This map taps into the place names contained in the USGS National Hydrography Dataset to show how the generic names of streams vary across the lower 48. Creeks and rivers are symbolized in gray due to their ubiquity (although the etymology behind the American use of creek is interesting), while bright colors symbolize other popular toponyms.
Lite-Brite aesthetic notwithstanding, I like this map because it  illustrates the range of cultural and environmental factors that affect  how we label and interact with the world. Lime green bayous follow historical French settlement patterns along the Gulf Coast and up  Louisiana streams. The distribution of the Dutch-derived term kill (dark blue) in New York echoes the colonial settlement of “New Netherland” (as well as furnishing half of a specific toponym to the Catskill Mountains). Similarly, the spanish-derived terms rio, arroyo, and cañada (orange hues) trace the early advances of conquistadors into present-day northern New Mexico, an area that still retains some unique cultural traits. Washes in the southwest reflect the intermittent rainfall of the region, while streams named swamps (desaturated green) along the Atlantic seaboard highlight where the coastal plain meets the Appalachian Piedmont at the fall line.
There are a few patterns on the map that I haven’t been able to  figure out. West Virginia shows a sharp north to south division between runs and branches that  continues to puzzle me. Some other geographic patterns I’ve noticed in  WV largely run parallel to the Appalachians, from the SE to NW. I don’t  know much about the area, though, and I have no idea what could be  behind such a distinct division. Any West Virginia-ites willing to take a  stab? I’m also intrigued by the patch of branches in southwestern Wisconsin, which I suspect may have something to do with the diffusion of naming practice by way of branch-loving Appalachian miners during a regional lead mining boom in the early 19th century.
This map originally came from a late 2009 project in a class by Joby Bass.  If I remade it now, I’d probably try to negotiate some of the overlaps  in symbology that happens in very crowded areas, but I still think it’s  interesting as-is. If you are interested in learning more about  toponyms, George Stewart’s Names on the Land is an engaging classic on naming practices in the US, and there are more specific articles about stream names from Wilbur Zelinsky and Robert West.”

A spatial look at the names associated with hydrography in the United States.  I never thought about how different hydrographic names varied by geographic region until I saw this map.  I always thought it was strange that when I moved to Virginia, everything was referred to as a Branch or Run instead of where I grew up in NY, everything was called a Kill or a Creek.

"Generic place names (or toponyms) such as Cumberland Gap or Mount Rainier provide general categorical descriptions of a geographic feature, in contrast to specific toponyms, which provide a unique identifier: Lake Huron. This map taps into the place names contained in the USGS National Hydrography Dataset to show how the generic names of streams vary across the lower 48. Creeks and rivers are symbolized in gray due to their ubiquity (although the etymology behind the American use of creek is interesting), while bright colors symbolize other popular toponyms.

Lite-Brite aesthetic notwithstanding, I like this map because it illustrates the range of cultural and environmental factors that affect how we label and interact with the world. Lime green bayous follow historical French settlement patterns along the Gulf Coast and up Louisiana streams. The distribution of the Dutch-derived term kill (dark blue) in New York echoes the colonial settlement of “New Netherland” (as well as furnishing half of a specific toponym to the Catskill Mountains). Similarly, the spanish-derived terms rio, arroyo, and cañada (orange hues) trace the early advances of conquistadors into present-day northern New Mexico, an area that still retains some unique cultural traits. Washes in the southwest reflect the intermittent rainfall of the region, while streams named swamps (desaturated green) along the Atlantic seaboard highlight where the coastal plain meets the Appalachian Piedmont at the fall line.

There are a few patterns on the map that I haven’t been able to figure out. West Virginia shows a sharp north to south division between runs and branches that continues to puzzle me. Some other geographic patterns I’ve noticed in WV largely run parallel to the Appalachians, from the SE to NW. I don’t know much about the area, though, and I have no idea what could be behind such a distinct division. Any West Virginia-ites willing to take a stab? I’m also intrigued by the patch of branches in southwestern Wisconsin, which I suspect may have something to do with the diffusion of naming practice by way of branch-loving Appalachian miners during a regional lead mining boom in the early 19th century.

This map originally came from a late 2009 project in a class by Joby Bass. If I remade it now, I’d probably try to negotiate some of the overlaps in symbology that happens in very crowded areas, but I still think it’s interesting as-is. If you are interested in learning more about toponyms, George Stewart’s Names on the Land is an engaging classic on naming practices in the US, and there are more specific articles about stream names from Wilbur Zelinsky and Robert West.”

I believe this neogeographic concept is the future of mapping.

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