Cartographia
The Multi-talented map… Maps as Art!
Globe Bowl from BH&GGlobe pendant lamps from The Bloomin Granny on EtsyUpcycled map Envelope by Direktrecycling Notebook by Saratops on EtsyMap Cushion by My Bearded Pigeon on EtsyWallpaper by Martha Stewart Living via Three Potato FourMap Bangles by Squishy Sushi on EtsyVintage Map belt Buckle

The Multi-talented map… Maps as Art!

Globe Bowl from BH&G
Globe pendant lamps from The Bloomin Granny on Etsy
Upcycled map Envelope by Direktrecycling 
Notebook by Saratops on Etsy
Map Cushion by My Bearded Pigeon on Etsy
Wallpaper by Martha Stewart Living via Three Potato Four
Map Bangles by Squishy Sushi on Etsy
Vintage Map belt Buckle

Watch 3D Spies of WWII on PBS. See more from NOVA.

3D #GEOINT from #WWII played a major role in ensuring success of D-Day Landing via @USGIF #remotesensing #war #history #map

Here’s the summary content about the show:

During World War II, Hitler’s scientists developed terrifying new weapons of mass destruction. Alarmed by rumors of advanced rockets and missiles, Allied intelligence recruited a team of brilliant minds from British universities and Hollywood studios to a country house near London. Here, they secretly pored over millions of air photos shot at great risk over German territory by specially converted, high-flying Spitfires. Peering at the photos through 3D stereoscopes, the team spotted telltale clues that revealed hidden Nazi rocket bases. The photos led to devastating Allied bombing raids that dealt crucial setbacks to the German rocket program and helped ensure the success of the D-Day landings. With 3D graphics that recreate exactly what the photo spies saw, NOVA tells the suspenseful, previously untold story of air photo intelligence that played a vital role in defeating the Nazis.”  ~ http://www.gotgeoint.com/archives/3d-geoint-from-the-wwii-played-major-role-ensuring-success-of-d-day-landing-and-more/

All:  If you live in the United States, please take this survey sponsored by the American Geographic Society.  You do not have to like geography to take it :)

Earth’s city lights at nightime - This #map says it all for all aspects of #geography.  #urbanization #humangeography #science

"This image of Earth’s city lights was created with data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Originally designed to view clouds by moonlight, the OLS is also used to map the locations of permanent lights on the Earth’s surface.
The brightest areas of the Earth are the most urbanized, but not necessarily the most populated. (Compare western Europe with China and India.) Cities tend to grow along coastlines and transportation networks. Even without the underlying map, the outlines of many continents would still be visible. The United States interstate highway system appears as a lattice connecting the brighter dots of city centers. In Russia, the Trans-Siberian railroad is a thin line stretching from Moscow through the center of Asia to Vladivostok. The Nile River, from the Aswan Dam to the Mediterranean Sea, is another bright thread through an otherwise dark region.
Even more than 100 years after the invention of the electric light, some regions remain thinly populated and unlit. Antarctica is entirely dark. The interior jungles of Africa and South America are mostly dark, but lights are beginning to appear there. Deserts in Africa, Arabia, Australia, Mongolia, and the United States are poorly lit as well (except along the coast), along with the boreal forests of Canada and Russia, and the great mountains of the Himalaya.
The Earth Observatory article Bright Lights, Big City describes how NASA scientists use city light data to map urbanization.”

Earth’s city lights at nightime - This #map says it all for all aspects of #geography.  #urbanization #humangeography #science

"This image of Earth’s city lights was created with data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Originally designed to view clouds by moonlight, the OLS is also used to map the locations of permanent lights on the Earth’s surface.

The brightest areas of the Earth are the most urbanized, but not necessarily the most populated. (Compare western Europe with China and India.) Cities tend to grow along coastlines and transportation networks. Even without the underlying map, the outlines of many continents would still be visible. The United States interstate highway system appears as a lattice connecting the brighter dots of city centers. In Russia, the Trans-Siberian railroad is a thin line stretching from Moscow through the center of Asia to Vladivostok. The Nile River, from the Aswan Dam to the Mediterranean Sea, is another bright thread through an otherwise dark region.

Even more than 100 years after the invention of the electric light, some regions remain thinly populated and unlit. Antarctica is entirely dark. The interior jungles of Africa and South America are mostly dark, but lights are beginning to appear there. Deserts in Africa, Arabia, Australia, Mongolia, and the United States are poorly lit as well (except along the coast), along with the boreal forests of Canada and Russia, and the great mountains of the Himalaya.

The Earth Observatory article Bright Lights, Big City describes how NASA scientists use city light data to map urbanization.”

My kids are fascinated by tracking Santa as he travels the world.  They are learning geography at the same time by asking me where he is now in relation to the United States.  Thanks NORAD!
“Starting around 2am EST on 24 December, Santa’s journey will begin and NORAD will once again be tracking his every move!”

http://www.noradsanta.org/en/track3d.html - Google Earth tracking
http://www.noradsanta.org/en/?!2d - Overview map of Santa previous stops

My kids are fascinated by tracking Santa as he travels the world.  They are learning geography at the same time by asking me where he is now in relation to the United States.  Thanks NORAD!

Starting around 2am EST on 24 December, Santa’s journey will begin and NORAD will once again be tracking his every move!”

http://www.noradsanta.org/en/track3d.html - Google Earth tracking

http://www.noradsanta.org/en/?!2d - Overview map of Santa previous stops


'Tabula Rogeriana' - map is a modern copy drawn by Muhammad al-Idrisi for Roger II of Sicily in 1154 A.D. and is an upside-down version with North Oriented up.




"Muhammed “al-Sharif” al-Idrisi (c. 1100-1165) was a major Muslim scholar, geographer and mapmaker of the medieval Islamic period. He was born in the town of Ceuta, in Morocco, and was descended from a line of nobleman who traced their lineage to the Prophet Mohammed.


Al-Idrisi took an interest in foreign lands and travel early in life. Starting in his teenage years, and continuing into adulthood, he made extensive voyages through Spain, North Africa, the Middle East and Europe, deliberately gathering geographical data along the way.


After completing university in Cordoba, Spain, he relocated to Sicily where the Normans had recently overthrown its Arab rulers. Opportunities were rife in Sicily for people like al-Idrisi since, as Ibn Jubayr, another Arab traveler-savant wrote, “the Normans tolerated and patronized a few Arab families in exchange for knowledge.”


Sicily’s new ruler, Roger II, invited al-Idrisi to join his court at Palermo. His education, travels, and his extensive political connections made him a valuable addition to the King’s court. Being a patron of the arts and sciences, and having huge interest geography, Roger commissioned al-Idrisi to produce a new map of the world that would rival no other. It was task that would consume a large portion of the mapmaker’s life.


Al-Idrisi combined his personal knowledge and experience with information from older maps, particularly Roman and Ptolemaic charts. He and his team also collected reports from seafaring Muslim merchants, Norman voyagers, and Christian scholars, and used that information to assemble what would be the most accurate map of its time.


In 1154, after 18 years of toil, al-Idrisi produced his magnum opus, a map which came to be called the “Tabula Rogeriana”, or the “Book of Roger”. It was a chart of the known world comprising Europe, Asia, and North Africa and the Horn of Africa – and extending all the way to Southeast Asia. Al-Idrisi is said to have presented the map to Roger on a disc of solid silver two metres in diameter. The map was also made into manuscript form, a few of which survive today.


In keeping with Islamic tradition, al-Idrisi’s map is oriented with the south appearing at top, and north at the bottom (the maps here are turned right-side up for viewing). Though lacking images of people, animals, or plants, it contains stylized portrayals of mountains and rivers. It is also one of the first maps of its kind to depict the Indian Ocean as an open body of water connecting to the Pacific – details which were perhaps provided by Arab and Chinese mariners.


For three centuries, geographers used al-Idrisi’s unaltered maps. His works inspired some of the world’s greatest explorers, scholars and cartographers including Ibn Battuta, Ibn Khaldun, Piri Re’is, Christopher Columbus and Vasco da Gama.”
'Tabula Rogeriana' - map is a modern copy drawn by Muhammad al-Idrisi for Roger II of Sicily in 1154 A.D. and is an upside-down version with North Oriented up.

"Muhammed “al-Sharif” al-Idrisi (c. 1100-1165) was a major Muslim scholar, geographer and mapmaker of the medieval Islamic period. He was born in the town of Ceuta, in Morocco, and was descended from a line of nobleman who traced their lineage to the Prophet Mohammed.

Al-Idrisi took an interest in foreign lands and travel early in life. Starting in his teenage years, and continuing into adulthood, he made extensive voyages through Spain, North Africa, the Middle East and Europe, deliberately gathering geographical data along the way.

After completing university in Cordoba, Spain, he relocated to Sicily where the Normans had recently overthrown its Arab rulers. Opportunities were rife in Sicily for people like al-Idrisi since, as Ibn Jubayr, another Arab traveler-savant wrote, “the Normans tolerated and patronized a few Arab families in exchange for knowledge.”

Sicily’s new ruler, Roger II, invited al-Idrisi to join his court at Palermo. His education, travels, and his extensive political connections made him a valuable addition to the King’s court. Being a patron of the arts and sciences, and having huge interest geography, Roger commissioned al-Idrisi to produce a new map of the world that would rival no other. It was task that would consume a large portion of the mapmaker’s life.

Al-Idrisi combined his personal knowledge and experience with information from older maps, particularly Roman and Ptolemaic charts. He and his team also collected reports from seafaring Muslim merchants, Norman voyagers, and Christian scholars, and used that information to assemble what would be the most accurate map of its time.

In 1154, after 18 years of toil, al-Idrisi produced his magnum opus, a map which came to be called the “Tabula Rogeriana”, or the “Book of Roger”. It was a chart of the known world comprising Europe, Asia, and North Africa and the Horn of Africa – and extending all the way to Southeast Asia. Al-Idrisi is said to have presented the map to Roger on a disc of solid silver two metres in diameter. The map was also made into manuscript form, a few of which survive today.

In keeping with Islamic tradition, al-Idrisi’s map is oriented with the south appearing at top, and north at the bottom (the maps here are turned right-side up for viewing). Though lacking images of people, animals, or plants, it contains stylized portrayals of mountains and rivers. It is also one of the first maps of its kind to depict the Indian Ocean as an open body of water connecting to the Pacific – details which were perhaps provided by Arab and Chinese mariners.

For three centuries, geographers used al-Idrisi’s unaltered maps. His works inspired some of the world’s greatest explorers, scholars and cartographers including Ibn Battuta, Ibn Khaldun, Piri Re’is, Christopher Columbus and Vasco da Gama.”
Mapped: Christmas Around the World - Here is my pre-Christmas posting.  Happy Holidays to everyone!

Mapped: Christmas Around the World - Here is my pre-Christmas posting.  Happy Holidays to everyone!

Twitter’s Early Growth Relied On Geographic Proximity via @RWW #twitter #map

Each circle represents a U.S. city containing Twitter users. Circles grow in size as more users sign up in that location over time. When a location has reached a “critical mass” of users, or 13.5% of all eventual users have signed up, the location turns red. The line being drawn across the center of the screen is a time series of the number of new users that signed up across the whole country in a given week.

Twitter Language Visualization World Map.
"Language communities of TwitterI had been wanting to make this for a while before finding out on Saturday that Mike McCandless had extracted Chrome’s open-source language detector into a standalone library, which suddenly made it much more practical.There are a lot of near-identical colors for different languages because I was optimizing for maximum distinguishability of languages used near each other rather than for global uniqueness. The exception is English, which is in gray because it is so common almost everywhere that it threw off the process of choosing the other colors.”Source: Data from the Twitter streaming API, May 14-October 20, 2011.  By Eric Fisher

Twitter Language Visualization World Map.

"Language communities of Twitter

I had been wanting to make this for a while before finding out on Saturday that Mike McCandless had extracted Chrome’s open-source language detector into a standalone library, which suddenly made it much more practical.

There are a lot of near-identical colors for different languages because I was optimizing for maximum distinguishability of languages used near each other rather than for global uniqueness. The exception is English, which is in gray because it is so common almost everywhere that it threw off the process of choosing the other colors.”

Source: Data from the Twitter streaming API, May 14-October 20, 2011.  By Eric Fisher

Census Bureau map of spatial distribution of indigenous people @NCGE #map #census #geography
"The U.S. Census Bureau has produced two new maps that would be  great resources when teaching about the distribution of indigenous peoples of the United States. Large maps show the American Indian and Alaska Native areas reported or delineated for the 2010 Census. Inset maps show native population on the county level. Other insets highlight data from the census. The map PDFs are available for free download. A 48-by-36-inch printed wall map is also available.”

Census Bureau map of spatial distribution of indigenous people @NCGE #map #census #geography

"The U.S. Census Bureau has produced two new maps that would be  great resources when teaching about the distribution of indigenous peoples of the United States. Large maps show the American Indian and Alaska Native areas reported or delineated for the 2010 Census. Inset maps show native population on the county level. Other insets highlight data from the census. The map PDFs are available for free download. A 48-by-36-inch printed wall map is also available.”

Greater Los Angeles #map — The Wonder City Of America minus the #LA river via @bigmapblog

Greater Los Angeles #map — The Wonder City Of America minus the #LA river via @bigmapblog

Tree species maps for European forests 

Tree species maps for European forests 

An informative map of Major Nuclear Disasters of the World - thanks to @Mapsofworld

An informative map of Major Nuclear Disasters of the World - thanks to @

Spatial distribution of college football bowl games @APHumanGeog #football #map

Spatial distribution of college football bowl games @ #football #map

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